itable

A table in a patcher window

Description

itable is similar in functionality to the table object, but provides a handy visual display of the table contents in your patcher window.

Arguments

None.

Messages

bang In left inlet: Same as a quantile message with a random number between 0 and 32,768 as an argument.
int index [int]
In left inlet: The number specifies an address in the itable. The value stored at that address is sent out the left outlet. However, if a value has been received in the right inlet, itable stores that value in the specified address, rather than sending out a number.

In right inlet: The number specifies a value to be stored in itable. The next address number received in the left inlet causes the value to be stored at that address.
  (inlet1) value to be stored [int]
In right inlet: The number specifies a value to be stored in itable. The next address number received in the left inlet causes the value to be stored at that address.
float index [float]
Converted to int.
list index and value [list]
In left inlet: The second number is stored in itable, at the address (index) specified by the first number.
clear In left inlet: Sets all values in the table to 0.
const number-to-store [int]
In left inlet: The word const, followed by a number, stores that number at all addresses in the table.
dump In left inlet: Sends all the numbers stored in the table out the left outlet in immediate succession, beginning with address 0.
fquantile floating point number [float]
In left inlet: The word fquantile, followed by a number between zero and one, multiplies the number by the sum of all the numbers in the table. Then, table sends out the address at which the sum of the all values up to that address is greater than or equal to the result.
getbits address [int]
starting bit location [int]
number of bits [int]
In left inlet: Gets the value of one or more specific bits of a number stored in the table, and sends that value out the left outlet. The word getbits is followed by three number arguments. The first argument is the address being referred to; the second argument is the starting bit location in the number stored at that address (the bit locations are numbered 0 to 31, from the least significant bit to the most significant bit); and the third argument specifies how many bits to the right of the starting bit location should be sent out. The specified bits are sent out the outlet as a single decimal integer.
For example, the message getbits 61 4 3 will look at address 61 in the table, start at bit location 4 (the fifth bit from the right), and send out the decimal number that corresponds to the 3 bits starting at that location. So, suppose that address 61 of the table stores the number 87. The binary form of 87 is 10 101 11. The 3 bits starting at bit location 4 are 101, which is the binary form of the decimal integer 5, so 5 is the number that is sent out the outlet.
goto address [int]
In left inlet: The word goto, followed by a number, sets a pointer to the address specified by the number. The pointer is set at the beginning of the table initially.
inv comparison value [int]
In left inlet: The word inv, followed by a number, finds the first value which is greater than or equal to that number, and sends the address of that value out the left outlet.
handtool 0/1 [list]
The word handtool, followed by a zero or one, toggles setting the itable object to use the hand tool. It is equivalent to setting the tool attribute.
max Sends the maximum value stored in the itable object out the left outlet.
min Sends the minimum value stored in the itable object out the left outlet.
(mouse) The values stored in table can be entered and edited graphically with the mouse.
length In left inlet: Sends the length (size) of the itable object out the left outlet.
linetool 0/1 [list]
The word linetool, followed by a zero or one, toggles setting the itable object to use the line tool. It is equivalent to setting the tool attribute.
load In left inlet: Puts the object in load mode. In load mode, every number received in the left inlet gets stored in the table, beginning at address 0 and continuing until the table is filled (or until the table is taken out of load mode by a normal message). If more numbers are received than will fit in the size of the table, excess numbers are ignored.
next In left inlet: Sends the value stored in the address pointed at by the goto pointer out the left outlet, then sets the pointer to the next address. If the pointer is currently at the last address in the itable object, it wraps around to the first address.
normal In left inlet: Undoes a prior load message; takes the itable object out of load mode and reverts it to normal operation.
quantile number [int]
In left inlet: The word quantile, followed by a number, multiplies the number by the sum of all the numbers in the itable object. This result is then divided by 2^15 (32,768). Then, table sends out the address at which the sum of all values up to that address is greater than or equal to the result.
penciltool 0/1 [list]
The word penciltool, followed by a zero or one, toggles setting the itable object to use the pencil tool. It is equivalent to setting the tool attribute.
prev In left inlet: Causes the same output as the word next, but the pointer is then decremented rather than incremented. If the pointer is currently at the first address in the itable object, it wraps around to the last address.
selecttool 0/1 [list]
The word selecttool, followed by a zero or one, toggles setting the itable object to use the select tool. It is equivalent to setting the tool attribute.
send receive object name [list]
The word send, followed by the name of a receive object, followed by an address number, sends the value stored at that address to all receive objects with that name, without sending the value out the itable object’s outlet.
set list of numbers [list]
In left inlet: The word set, followed by a list of numbers, stores values in certain addresses. The first number after the word set specifies an address. The next number is the value to be stored in that address, and each number after that is stored in a successive address.
setbits address [int]
starting bit location [int]
number of bits [int]
value to set [int]
In left inlet: Changes the value of one or more specific bits of a number stored in the itable object. The word setbits is followed by four number arguments. The first argument is the address being referred to; the second argument is the starting bit location in the number stored at that address (the bit locations are numbered 0 to 31, from the least significant bit to the most significant bit); the third argument specifies how many bits to the right of the starting bit location should be modified, and the fourth argument is the value (stated in decimal or hexadecimal form) to which those bits should be set.
For example, the message setbits 47 5 3 6 will look at address 47 in the itable object, start at bit location 5 (the sixth bit from the right), and replace the 3 bits starting at that location with the bits 110 (the binary equivalent of the decimal integer 6). Suppose that address 47 of the itable object stores the number 87. The binary form of 87 is 1 010 111, so replacing the 3 bits starting at bit location 5 with 110 would change the number to 1 110 111, which is the binary form of the decimal integer 119. The new number stored at address 47 in the itable object will therefore be 119.
sum In left inlet: Sends the sum of all the values in the itable object out the left outlet.
read filename [symbol]
In left inlet: The word read, followed by a name, opens and reads data values from a file in Text or Max binary format. Without an argument, read opens a standard Open Document dialog for choosing a file to read values from. If the file contains valid data, the entire contents of the existing table are replaced with the data.
refer table name [symbol]
In left inlet: The word refer, followed by the name of another table, sets the receiving itable object to read its data values from a named table object.
write In left inlet: Opens a standard save file dialog for choosing a name to write data values from the itable object. The file can be saved in Text or Max binary format.

Attributes

Name Type g/s Description
autohint int
def.:1
Toggles display of the mouse position when positioned over the table.
bgcolor float
def.:0.93 0.93 0.93 1.
Sets the table background color in RGBA format.
bgcolor2 float
def.:1. 1. 1. 1.
Sets the outer background (text area) color in RGBA format.
bordercolor float
def.:0. 0. 0. 1.
Sets the table border color in RGBA format.
embed int
def.:1
Toggles the ability to embed the table and save its data as part of the main patch. The default behavior is 1 (save the subpatch).
legend int
def.:1
Toggles the display of the table legend.
linecolor float
def.:0. 0. 0. 0.3
Sets the color used in line mode in RGBA format.
name symbol Specifies the name of a table. You can also specify the name of an itable object using an argument. Max looks for an itable object of the same name which has been saved as a separate file. If two or more table objects share the same names, they also share the same values.

For information about using named objects in Max for Live, click here.
notename int
def.:0
Toggles Y axis display using MIDI note names.
pointcolor float
def.:0. 0. 0. 1.
Sets the table points color in RGBA format.
range int Specifies the range of values which can be displayed on the y axis of the editing window. A newly created table has a range of 128, from 0 to 127.
signed int
def.:0
Toggles the ability to store and display signed integer values. A newly created table with signed values has a range of 128, from -128 to 127.
size int Specifies the number of values stored in the table. The default is 128 values, indexed with numbers from 0 to 127.
textcolor float
def.:0. 0. 0. 1.
Sets the table text color in RGBA format.
tool int
def.:0
Sets the tool used when graphically interacting with the object. The options are:

0: Pencil tool
1: Line tool
2: Select tool
3: Move tool

Information for box attributes common to all objects

Examples

See Also

Name Description
capture Store numbers to view or edit
coll Store and edit a collection of different messages
funbuff Store x,y pairs of numbers together
histo Make a histogram of the numbers received
multislider Multiple slider and scrolling display
table Store and graphically edit an array of numbers
text Format messages as a text file
Max Basic Tutorial 17: Data Structures And Probability Max Basic Tutorial 17: Data Structures And Probability